Prédictions hasardeuses

The Best Article Every Day publie un florilège de prédictions péremptoires qui démontrent, s'il le fallait encore, que la vision d'un leader est moins importante que sa capacité à mobiliser les foules. Petite sélection de mise en bouche :

«We will bury you.»
Nikita Krushchev, Soviet Premier, predicting Soviet communism will win over U.S. capitalism, 1958.

«Everything that can be invented has been invented.»
Charles H. Duell, an official at the US patent office, 1899.

«It will be gone by June.»
Variety, passing judgement on rock ‘n roll in 1955.

«This antitrust thing will blow over.»
Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft.

«It will be years - not in my time - before a woman will become Prime Minister.»
Margaret Thatcher, future Prime Minister, October 26th, 1969.

«Read my lips: NO NEW TAXES.»
George Bush, 1988.

«That virus is a pussycat.»
Dr. Peter Duesberg, molecular-biology professor at U.C. Berkeley, on HIV, 1988.

«Sensible and responsible women do not want to vote.»
Grover Cleveland, U.S. President, 1905.

«That the automobile has practically reached the limit of its development is suggested by the fact that during the past year no improvements of a radical nature have been introduced.»
Scientific American, Jan. 2 edition, 1909.

«Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible.»
Lord Kelvin, British mathematician and physicist, president of the British Royal Society, 1895.

«Radio has no future.»
Lord Kelvin, Scottish mathematician and physicist, former president of the Royal Society, 1897.

«Nuclear-powered vacuum cleaners will probably be a reality in 10 years.»
Alex Lewyt, president of vacuum cleaner company Lewyt Corp., in the New York Times in 1955.

«Atomic energy might be as good as our present-day explosives, but it is unlikely to produce anything very much more dangerous.»
Winston Churchill, British Prime Minister, 1939.

«It’s a great invention but who would want to use it anyway?»
Rutherford B. Hayes, U.S. President, after a demonstration of Alexander Bell’s telephone, 1876.

«X-rays will prove to be a hoax.»
Lord Kelvin, President of the Royal Society, 1883.

«The phonograph has no commercial value at all.»
Thomas Edison, American inventor, 1880s.

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